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Eileen RN
All I know is my own medical history. The only dietary change I made was adding 2-3 tablespoons throughout the day 4 months ago. I’m still overweight and have not done anything else to improve my health, including leading a sedentary lifestyle at 68 (female). My total cholesterol has dropped from 208 to 187, my triglycerides have gone from 180 to 70, my non HDL has gone from 180 to 133, and my LDL from 122 to 117. Not perfect but fasting labs don’t lie and neither do I.
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Watch out
I am a normal customer that naively bought Gundry’s olive oil off of Amazon.

It arrived very rancid. I took it to my local Olive Oil Sommelier and she confirmed that it is indeed rancid and she has had numerous customers that have had the same problem.

When I tried to return it, Gundry MD on Amazon will not allow me to return it, or refund any money. I contacted Gundry’s organization directly and they refuse to stand behind it. I have wasted considerable time on this to no avail. So, not only do I have a very expensive product I cannot use, it is appearing that he is running a scam (in addition to everything in this article).
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pat demers
Glad I read this article.
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Daniel
It's funny how no one actually checks the study that Dr. Gundry actually references. I looked it up and nothing is even mentioned about extra virgin oils. Reading it, the study discusses virgin olive oils and the "reliability" of lab analysis techniques to determine their polyphenol content. It's just convenient marketing to quote some old study from 2004, unrelated, to give more credibility to one's product. And a deceiving one for sure,

"Comparability and reliability of different techniques for the determination of phenolic compounds in virgin olive oil" by Karel Hrncirik Sonja Fritsche

In it, only 24 samples of virgin olive oil are used from different regions (and no Moroccan olives)
It's actually available for free here:

https://zh.booksc.eu/book/1292780/209a2a

So the claim 30 times is essentially bogus. And this is referring only to hydroxytyrosol, as advertised on the bottle, only one of the many polyphenols naturally present. Sure, Gundry's olive oil may have more polyphenols than refined olives oil, but that's like saying that whole wheat bread has more fibre than "regular" bread, regular being white bread. The refining process will remove the fibre.

There has never been a lab quality certificate as to its composition, it is just a claim. Meanwhile, there are actually some producers that have run a lab analysis and list the amount of polyphenols. I would probably go with those for quality assurance.
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Edward
I bought the 3 bottle special, and opened one bottle, and used it 3 times. It smelled very bad, and taste very bad. The bottle date looked tampered with like it was rubbed off and another date was stamped on.
Because of the rotten smell, and taste I don't trust this olive oil, and will try to get a refund.
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Sdevine
Thanks! You saved me $$
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Betsy Smith
Thank you for your information, much appreciated since I love to cook and use EVOO every day.
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Yank ee
The first time I heard Gundry speak I knew he was a fraud. I have degrees in Phys Ed and Biology and have a book published on natural healing. Gundry mentions in one of his earlier ads that he was seventy pounds overweight and couldn't shake it, even with being a strict vegetarian. working out at the gym and running five miles a day. Regardless of whatever else one's body is doing to process fats at a less than optimum level, that's completely impossible. I immediately knew that he was a liar. Be careful - Gundry's oil likely comes from snakes rather than olives.
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MarieBe418
All I can add is Thank you Thank you and Thank you!
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Natty
Thank you for writing this!!!
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Scot
Gundry is a quack when nutriional theories are involved. No hard scientific evidence around the lectin theory. In addition his super polyphenol oil and its cost is ridiculous. Look at the theories of T. Colin Cambell amd Esselstyn and Gundry carries no weight in the nutrional arena.
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Bob G.
So glad I read this! THANK YOU!!!
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Catherine Jack
Hi, I buy olive oil since more than 20 years. I love Gundry MD olive oil, it tastes great to me, I put it on my salad, pasta, and I sometimes drink it like Dr Gundry suggests. What the below comments I read do not say is that this Gundry MD olive oil is SUPER RICH in polyphenols and especially hydroxytyrosol, the most potent of all the olive oil polyphenols and antioxidants. You can google “hydroxytyrosol”, you will find a lot of scientific studies on the health benefits of this polyphenol. So it is good for my health, good for my body!

Personally, I don’t care if this olive oil is theoretically rancid, it is not to me, I love the smell of honey on it.

Since I started taking this Gundry MD olive oil, my bad cholesterol rare dropped a lot and my sugar rate finally stabilized! Never got that with the others extra virgin olive oils I used to buy in the past.

The hydroxytyrosol content of Gundry MD olive oil is VERY HIGH. Good for my body, good for my health! I am Italian and I used to buy Italian, Spanish, Greek olive oil in the past, and they never got such a high richness in hydroxytyrosol!

Your article only mentions total polyphenols. How about hydroxytyrosol ?

This olive oil has got an extraordinary richness in hydroxytyrosol, which is the most powerful among all polyphenols, just google about it and you will read all the science associated to it! Gundry olive oil has more than 200 mg/Kg of total hydroxytyrosol.

Just for your information, an "regular" extra virgin olive oil that we found on supermarket shelves and coming from Spain, Italy or Greece has an average of 3 to 5 mg / Kg of hydroxytyrosol content.

Thus, the levels found in Gundry MD olive oil are by far the highest that we can find in the market. Gundry MD olive oil is even higher than 30 times richer in polyphenols hydroxytyrosol!

I also like the fact this olive oil is made in the desert of Morocco, thus it is free from pesticides residues, and free from heavy metals. In Europe, we find many olive groves nearby polluting industrial zones.

Thank you for your attention.
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Chuey Bluey
Would you still have the same POV if you learned the hydroxytyrosol found in Dr Gundry's oil was an additive? Google "Novel Food" hydroxytyrosol. I honestly have no information that this is the case, but it is worth pondering, considering the adulteration of Olive Oils proven to have taken place in bottles labeled "pure Extra Virgin Olive Oil from [Mediterranean Country]".
I read a scholarly article (but plain language understandable by most laymen), which determined NF hydroxytyrosol was safe to add to foods (not just Olive Oil). The main problem i would have with the practice would be NOT DISCLOSING IT.
(Again, no accusations here. Just can't understand why it would not be mentioned or be withheld.)
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Kat
The comment you replied to is obviously a Gundry associate.

The problem with just coming out and saying it's enriched with an additive is that it's being pitched as a high-quality olive oil -- not motor oil with an additive, which is what the cited expert said it tastes like.
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Z
The olive oil that Gundry is selling is just him private labeling a product that's been on the market for many years called "Olivie Plus 30x".

I tried it years ago and it really tastes horrid, but if you're curious you can find it on Amazon at a fraction of what he's selling his BS brand for.
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jmdan
Never trust an online doctor who sells products.
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Thomas
Instead of paying this lying witch doctor $200, you can support 4 families by paying the very fair price of $40 for excellent high quality and true EVOO. Buy from small, honest farms.
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Drew Cif
How do you know where to find a small honest farm?
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Christina Crawford
My mother bought this ****, it tastes rotten. Regardless of taste and obvious pseudoscience, anyone who spends $200 on some hotel bar sized olive oil should drink a liter of this mud. I would say she was scammed, but the scam was too obvious to feel like any trickery was involved. She scammed herself. Dr. Gundry is the Devil, but my mother is the Devil's spawn. 3/10
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GeneC
Interesting comments, did you mom avail the 90 day refund? I have returned other products to Dr. Gundry with no problem on the refund.
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Sandra
You were very lucky, but why all the returns? I bought a product which created a bad reaction and they were not interested in refunding me. After many conversations and piece-meal repayments after mailing back the medicine at my expense I was finally fully refunded. This is
NOT a company I would ever recommend.
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Olivedon
With all I have learned about the corruption in the Olive oil (it is not oil, it is the juice of the Olive fruit) industry, any alert to mis-conceptions or fraud are helpful. Truth in labeling is vital. Olive oil "police" are needed everywhere. I support the truth in labeling and strive for quality of California Olive oil via the California Olive Oil Council and the Olive center at U.C. Davis. There are many honest Olive oil producers throughout the Olive world. Take the time to research what you consume, it is worth the effort. Thank you Olive Oil Times for the information, as always, very helpful.
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Alfred
One wonders why a surgeon would need to make more money by lying about products and health matters.
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Onochie
Valid question.
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Irishjim
GREED just plain greed.
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El Moro
But you understand that this is not olive oil. It’s not oil kade from the fruit (the olive), the leaves and the branches. It’s a health supplement not a gourmet olive oil for tossing on your salad.
On the other hand I see some Eurocentric tendencies having issues with an olive oil from Africa striving considering the amount of articles...
Sure this doctor knows nothing about olive oil. But the point is that this is a nutritional supplement from olive oil. Can your article explain that?
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Dr Simon Poole
The Olive Oil Times is to be congratulated for this well researched article and for "calling out" any MD, in unequivocal terms, who might bring the medical profession into disrepute. Clearly, it is the duty of a doctor to communicate lifestyle advice to support patients because it has such a profound effect, and as long as he or she can substantiate what they are advocating by citing robust evidence, this is to be encouraged. Indeed, responsibility for communicating dietary advice should have equal importance to recommending a particular medication or therapy.

A number of us have spent many years pressing for more formal nutritional training of Medics. One of the challenges however is that formal, mainstream education in nutrition has been "behind the curve" of evidence, just as public health messages have promulgated low fat or reductionist science such as those used in food labelling systems. That said, there are examples of MDs who work hard to ensure their patients can benefit from straightforward and sound dietary advice.

The subject of polyphenols is fascinating, not least because of remaining uncertainties about their mode of bioactivity in the context of antioxidant claims and the marketing of polyphenols as supplements or oils as medicines.

However, meanwhile, moral and regulatory expectations for doctors are clear;

A doctor has a responsibility to practice within his or her competence and defer to specialist advice when appropriate. In the UK a doctor is not allowed to directly promote a particular product with a commercial affiliation, though they are allowed to be quoted on matters of generality. Any conflict of interest must be declared. A physician must at all times act with honesty and integrity.

In the UK a doctor could otherwise be expected to be referred to the professional regulatory body, and if found wanting, would have restrictions placed upon, or even removal of, his or her licence to practice.

For those of us committed to making high quality advice available to our patients and the public, which includes the beneifts of extra virgin olive oil as part of the Mediterranean Diet, the exposure of poor quality, conflicted and potentially misleading behaviour is extraordinarily important.
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Clay
Your sense of entitlement is suffocating. You habit of using the UK as a model of anything is unsubstantiated. You can only stand in YOU as a reference, yet you do anything but. You throw in supposed practices and standards, irrelevant in reference to the subject, as means to discredit. There is no honesty or integrity in that. Take your own advice and defer to Dr. Gundry.
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Rkenn..
Gundry is a proven liar, snake oil salesman and disreputable businessman. Consume his product if you wish, but be prepared to suffer the consequences.
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Bernie
I think this hit piece says more about this author than Dr. Gundry who has saved countless lives. There’s no arguing that there’s been some major problems with the contents and labeling of mainstream olive oil producers. Thank goodness he brings it to the public’s attention.
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